Tomohiro Inaba and wire

on

Tomohiro Inaba (1984), sculptor.

Tomohiro Inaba is a young artist who finished his graduate studies in 2010. He is attracted to iron as a material among other reasons because it begins to rust and decay upon contact with air, practically the moment it is created. For some his two-dimensional work he has used heat-sensitive paper, a likewise ephemeral material.

Though made from solid iron wire, many of his sculptures appear freely woven. Their foundation is an anatomically correct solid form but it shoots off in incredibly complex tangles of steel wire that manifest themselves like violent pencil scribbles.

Each sculpture appears to start off anatomically perfect, a delicate fawn nibbling in the grass or a sinister black skull resting on its chin, but each devolves into an impossibly complex tangle of steel wire that twists vertically into the sky like violent pencil scribbles.

The pieces shown are firmly rooted to the ground from the point of impact. From these points the sculptures shows a finished render of the subject, then as it extends outwards, it becomes distorted transforming into an entanglement of wires. While doing so, the likeness of the subject is still maintained.

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s